Tulip Troubles?

laurapedini

So I know its been a while since my last post, but I have sadly been mourning the loss of my compost heap. We are having issues with voles and/or moles so we had to eliminate anything that could be attracting them to our yard.

Anyway…on to the topic of this post: Tulips.

Are your tulips dying? Drooping? Slimy? All together worthless at this point? Fret not friends, there is an easy solution!
You can easily transform your tulip beds into container garden masterpieces.

I have been doing some research and found out that there are lots of ways to tackle this issue. I will first tell you the things that I found out, then I’m going to tell you what we ended up doing.
Some people leave the whole thing alone and let nature take its course, strategically planting summer flowers or annuals around the dying tulips as to…

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Tulip Troubles?

So I know its been a while since my last post, but I have sadly been mourning the loss of my compost heap. We are having issues with voles and/or moles so we had to eliminate anything that could be attracting them to our yard.

Anyway…on to the topic of this post: Tulips.

Are your tulips dying? Drooping? Slimy? All together worthless at this point? Fret not friends, there is an easy solution!
You can easily transform your tulip beds into container garden masterpieces.

I have been doing some research and found out that there are lots of ways to tackle this issue. I will first tell you the things that I found out, then I’m going to tell you what we ended up doing.
Some people leave the whole thing alone and let nature take its course, strategically planting summer flowers or annuals around the dying tulips as to camouflage what’s going on and distract onlookers from the mess. Still others cut back the brown foliage, and wrap what little green is left around each bulb, tie with some type of twine, and replant (I think, it wasn’t made clear if they were extracted/wrapped/replanted or if they were just binding the leaves themselves leaving the bulbs in the ground) so the bulbs can feed through the year. Those using this method also plan ahead and pre-plant their summer bloomers around these bundles or create a temporary container garden in the beds.

This is what we did in our yard…..
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And this…..
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This is what we stored our bulbs in….
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In both beds, we cut down the dead and dying parts and dug up the bulbs completely.
You may respond later that you can’t believe I am asking you to do so much work, but believe me, you don’t want to leave the decomposing leaves in the bed, or the bulbs in the ground until next spring.
Bulbs left in ground produce baby bulbs. These babies take a couple seasons to mature so they won’t actually grow back right away. The “mother” bulbs are so depleted after this process they end up not being that great when they come back next Spring. So I urge you to cut down the yucky ugly stuff right now or very soon, depending on the status of your tulips. Get those bulbs out of the ground and store them in a plastic bag or bucket, in a cool dry place, and replant them in the Fall. This is what we are trying out this season and I did enough reading to be convinced it is the best way to go.
Happy gardening!
Until next time 🙂

composting and its benefits

compost-junk

I have been interested in gardening and composting for several years. I successfully began growing my own vegetables and herbs over the past three years. I didn’t always have the biggest yard to work with, but since moving to Fredericksburg, VA from a town house with a tiny yard, to a full sized family house with a huge back yard, I have been able to realize my passion for the gardening arts. Last year I began researching compost and its unbelievable benefits to, not only the garden, but also the environment. I decided I would try my hand at it and see how it turns out. I wasn’t sure I had done it correctly, and since I started it late that summer, I had no choice but to leave it alone until after the cold seasons passed. Barely giving the poor thing a fighting chance, I figured all was lost. Imagine my surprise when I turned the pile this spring, and found underneath the unprocessed material the richest, most beautiful compost I have ever seen! I separated the nutrient-rich dirt from the the outer “cocoon” of newspaper shreds, grass clippings, and other random organic matter. I then added it to mom’s flower beds and my vegetable and herb beds before we planted. Once we got all of our beauties into the ground, I made sure to pay close attention to see if I could conduct a little research throughout this growing season to compare growth rate and yield where applicable. So far I am amazed at the results. Two months have hardly passed and I can already see a huge difference between now, using compost, and the past few years we have planted without the use of compost. My next post will be coming soon. I plan to add some photos, as well as detailed information about composting. If anyone has questions or needs advice on how to do anything garden-related, feel free to leave a comment. Thanks for reading, and happy gardening!